PEACE, CONFLICT, AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT, NEWS AND EVENTS FROM THE SPECIAL INTEREST GROUP

 

Our inaugural event
A screening of "First, they killed my father"
We had our first event on Friday, 15th of February and we would all like to sincerely thank everyone who
attended. We would like to thank all our guests from the Cambodian Association of Hong Kong, in particular
Mr Ravindra Ngo, Mr Vikrant Chap, and Mr Vutha Ros, for sharing the event with others and for leading the
discussion after the movie screening.
Although it was a sensitive topic, and deeply personal for several of the attendees, we all benefited
from the sincere and enlightening discussion we shared afterwards. I think we all took away a better
understanding of how genocides affect nations and how universal and resilient the human spirit is.
It was not just about loss though, as we discussed the future of Cambodia and the issues the nation now faces.
It must recoup it's economic loss, its cultural identity, and its history. This will be a difficult process and there is
uncertainty how it could or should be achieved so it will be a tricky road to walk. Cambodia has a rich cultural
and national identity, which has been partly forgotten because of the tragedies committed under the Khmer
Rouge, but there is an identity, and possibly going beyond the recent history is a way to find it.
I think we all hope that Cambodia will not be lost to the highest bidder though. For a land so beautiful and a
people so kind and strong, the tragic past events will hopefully not leave a dark mark for long. We look
forward to working with the Cambodian Association of Hong Kong further through CERC and being able to
spread more awareness and understanding.




Our next event:
Thursday 21st March at 18:00
in Runme Shaw Building, Room 403
Why are there so many shootings in places that should be considered safe spaces? What are the dynamics
taking place between race, politics, economics, sexuality, and how do these contribute to the prevalence of
gun violence in the USA? What can be done and who can do it?
Join us to share your thoughts and hopefully gain a new perspective on gun violence in schools in the USA.
We'll be looking at the people behind the tragic statistics and enhancing our shared knowledge through a
presentation, two very moving and informative TED talks, and discussions throughout.
Please come and bring your questions and opinions, all our welcome to voice their thoughts.
Here are some links to help start the conversation:
https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2018/dec/09/sandy-hook-promise-gun-violence-school-shootingreport-2018
https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2018/local/us-school-shootings-history/?noredirect=on&utm_term=.8a109f65ad16
https://www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2017/10/2/16399418/us-gun-violence-statistics-maps-charts
10 Pro-Gun Myths, Shot Down
https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-47396340 We look forward to seeing you there. Please share the event with your friends and colleagues. Register here for the event: https://goo.gl/forms/VWsUuNTm3RAYztFs1 Please join us in sharing your thoughts and views.

 

Experiences of Non-Local Research Postgraduate Students at HKU Teaching Development Grant Report

Team: Dr Liz Jackson, Faculty of Education, Dr Lucy Jordan, Faculty of Social Sciences, Ms Yulia Nesterova, Education, Dr Gizem Arat, Social Sciences & Dr Zhou Xiaochen, Social Sciences.

Respondent: Prof Gray Kochhar-Lindgren, Director, Common Core Curriculum

The University of Hong Kong attracts research students from around the world due to its international outlook, unique sociocultural and economic position, and innovative practices. Internationalization and the resulting diverse body of students, however, pose challenges in terms of curriculum, teaching, learning environments, supervision, and other activities. Little is known about the experiences of non-local (Mainland Chinese and overseas) research postgraduate students. This Teaching Development Grant project examined the experiences of non-local students at HKU, incorporating qualitative and quantitative methods in an exploratory sequential research design. The project aims to develop recommendations for on-campus activities to enrich students’ experiences and improve the multicultural community at the University.

Date: Wednesday, March 13, 2019
Time: 12:30 – 13:45
Venue: Room 5.33, Jockey Club Tower, Centennial Campus

“Profile of a Comparative and International Education Leader: Mark Bray” by W. James Jacob and Journal of the WCCES

Journal of the WCCES has recently published a bibliographical article about Professor Mark Bray and his distinguished career:

Mark Bray’s profile is a biographical sketch of his contributions to the field of comparative and international education (CIE). This profile also documents his distinguished career in which he rose to senior leadership positions in higher education and international development organizations including UNESCO. Mark served as President of the World Council of Comparative Education Societies (2004-2007), Director of UNESCO’s International Institute for Educational Planning (2006-2010), and as President of the Comparative Education Society of Hong Kong (CESHK) and the US-based Comparative and International Education Society (CIES). The article is based on multiple data gathering techniques and oral interviews. Highlights include a review of some of Mark’s key career milestones, leadership positions and accomplishments, as well as several publications that have helped shape and impact CIE worldwide.

We are attaching the full article for your convenient reading: Profile of a Comparative and International Education Leader: Mark Bray by W. James Jacob.

Freedom to Teach, Freedom to Learn: Higher Education and Human Dignity

Comparative Education Research Centre (CERC)/ Springer

Editors:
Anatoly Oleksiyenko & Liz Jackson

Freedom to teach and freedom to learn (Lehrfreiheit and Lernfreiheit) have become imperatives of research universities that followed the Humboldtian model of higher education and shaped the benchmarks for reputational performance, competition and hierarchical stratification over the last few decades. Freedom and responsibility have become a conflictual dichotomy in the studies of higher education as markets and hierarchies became two major domains shaping and distributing status goods in most societies. Defining a good in the context of international higher learning has become also problematic as freedoms of mobility, inquiry and argument implied strategizing often in disregard of ethics, politics, and social discourses. The literature in the field of global mobility and higher learning has provided a range of examples where advantages for some have been raising anxiety and competition for access to status goods worldwide. Alas, the literature has provided little insight into how freedom of teaching and learning comes into play with social responsibilities in various cultural domains and political systems.

With increasing influence of illiberalism, freedom should not be considered or interpreted lightly. Academic freedom, for example, has never been challenged as much as it is today when the post-truth societies primarily make universities battlefields of politicized emotions and expressions. At the same time, with intelligence commodified, reified or marginalized, the freedom of mobility can entail a fight for entitlements or an escape from local responsibilities. The decline of academic freedom or the absence of forces to defend it are related challenges. These challenges grow as the competition of ideas, sometimes under the rubric of academic freedom, often implies the power struggle and questioning of statuses in the so-called “marketplace of ideas”. Competition per se becomes more important than human dignity, which was originally supposed to expand and strengthen under freedoms to teach and learn. What had been happening to these freedoms across different subject positions and cultures of higher education, remains largely underexplored.

As the waves of globalization encourage rethinking the freedom to teach and the freedom to learn, this project will engage scholars from around the world to rethink the currency of ideas, concepts and practices related to dignity, freedom, independence, and responsibility in higher education. Are there sufficient freedoms to teach and to learn in modern colleges and universities these days? Are they linked effectively with academic responsibilities? Do these freedoms as they are perceived and/or practiced within and across diverse geographic contexts align effectively with requirements to enhance human dignity? How do freedom to teach and freedom to learn get shaped by relationships of students and scholars to each other and to structural aspects of higher education and the marketplace of ideas? What is still missing in the current discourse and applications in classrooms, online spaces, etc.? What are the implications of the presence or absence of these freedoms in the post-truth world, and the expanding illiberalism and hybrid wars? Developing critical responses to these and other questions through comparative research, will enhance our insight into how tensions between freedoms and responsibilities are managed and resolved in this “brave new world.”

We are inviting scholars of comparative and international higher education to participate in the CERC/Springer publication project. We look forward to receiving extended abstracts (circa 800 words) by May 1, 2019. We are planning to inform about our decision by June 15, 2019 and we would be happy to help authors to develop their full chapters (circa 6,000 words) by May 1, 2020. The volume will be published at the end of 2020.

Gender in Educational Research: A Historical Glimpse Through the Archives of Educational Philosophy and Theory

This Gender Plus Education seminar is part of the Women’s Studies Research Centre’s GENDER PLUS series.

Although gender and feminist theory might seem like old news today, a historical examination shows these strains of thought have only been part of educational research for a relatively short time. The new text From “Aggressive Masculinity” to “Rape Culture”: A Gender and Sexualities Reader (Routledge 2018) uses sample texts from the historical archive of the leading educational research journal Educational Philosophy and Theory to explore and document the way gender and social justice have been understood over the last 5 decades. Taking its provocative title from the book end chapters of the volume — this book and some of its key themes will be explored in this session, from the perspectives of philosophy and education.

The session documents through a historical perspective how gender and feminism have been taken up in philosophy of education, and gives the audience a chance to discuss with one of its editors how the field of educational theory evolves over time. The session will be chaired by Puja Kapai, Associate Professor of Law and Convenor of the Women’s Studies Research Centre.

Dr. Liz Jackson is President of the Philosophy of Education Society of Australasia (PESA) and an Associate Professor of Education and the Director of the Comparative Education Research Centre at HKU. Her first two single-authored books (both with Routledge) are Muslims and Islam In US Education: Reconsidering Multiculturalism and Questioning Allegiance: Resituating Civic Education. Her research has been recognised with awards including the Research Output Prize for Education at HKU and the PESA Book Award. She serves as an editor for New Directions in the Philosophy of Education (Routledge), Educational Philosophy and Theory: Editor’s Choice, and as Deputy Editor for the leading journal in philosophy of education, Educational Philosophy and Theory.

Registration is here.

Lithuanian higher education in the 21st century: Post-Soviet remnants, European integration, and new challenges and opportunities

In the past 28 years since regaining independence from the Soviet Union, Lithuania has transformed its society and the higher education system. Since joining the European Union in 2004, Lithuanian higher education has aligned its policies and practices with the EU. This integration created many opportunities as well as some challenges.  In this presentation, we will examine how the system of higher education in Lithuania has developed from the Soviet to current times and how the integration into the European Union higher education community has created new possibilities for Lithuanian scholars.

In this presentation, the speakers will discuss the effects of both the past and current developments and will share the contemporary needs of the Lithuanian higher education community. The topics to be explored include:

  • Institutional autonomy of the academic community and the interaction with state needs;
  • Development of research, science, and innovation in Lithuania;
  • Challenges in human resources
  • Student preparation for higher education studies;
  • Support for under-privileged social groups

The current research project, “Researching Specialist Training to Provide Holistic Help to People with Disabilities in the Health Care System while Improving Researcher Competencies” will be used as a telling case to ground the discussions of the history, developments, and needs in Lithuanian higher education.

Chair: Dr. Susan Bridges. Discussants: Dr. Liz Jackson, Dr. Anatoly Oleksiyenko.

 

Presenters:


Prof. Audra Skukauskaitė is a senior researcher at Klaipeda University, Lithuania, as well as an independent researcher and research consultant for the Lemelson-MIT program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in the USA. Dr. Skukauskaitė resides in the US and serves as an adjunct professor of qualitative research methodologies in the College of Integrated Medicine and Health Sciences and the College of Social Sciences at Saybrook University in California, USA. Dr. Skukauskaitė has conducted seminars on varied qualitative research methodologies in Lithuania, Finland, Sweden, Australia and the US and has taught writing for academic publication in English for international scholars.  Dr. Skukauskaitė has published numerous research articles and book chapters focusing on ethnography, research epistemology and transparency, transcribing and interviewing, as well as on the teaching and learning of research. Dr. Skukauskaitė serves on editorial boards of four journals and has an extensive experience of reviewing and supporting the writing of manuscripts for academic publications. Over the past 15 years, Dr. Skukauskaitė has served in multiple leadership positions in the American Educational Research Association. Currently, she serves as chair of the Qualitative Research section of the Measurement and Research Methodology Division (D) as well as chair of the John. J. Gumperz Lifetime Achievement Award committee of the Language and Social Processes SIG at AERA.

As a researcher, research consultant, and professor of research methodologies and qualitative research, over her career, Dr. Skukauskaitė has worked with diverse scholars and students across disciplines to develop, conduct, and support research studies in complex educational and transdisciplinary environments. Her recent work has explored invention education and ways of utilizing ethnographic and discourse-based research epistemologies to examine complex processes of constructing and publishing research in science and engineering education. Dr. Skukauskaitė’s overarching interests focus on ways of utilizing research-based ways of thinking and knowing to develop deeper understandings and trustworthy representations of the complex processes and practices of learning, teaching, and living in dynamic academic, socio-historical, economic, and cultural environments.


Prof. Ingrida Baranauskienė is a professor of Education and head researcher at the Faculty of Health Sciences of Klaipėda University (Lithuania). For over ten years, the professor has been the dean of the Faculty of Social Welfare and Disability Studies of Šiauliai University. The field of her scientific interests: preconditions for success in social participation of people with disabilities. I. Baranauskienė is a co-author of two monographs on the participation of people with disabilities in the labour market, an initiator of five scientific studies presenting research on social exclusion. She is an author of many scientific articles on disability research. To make an impact on active practice of Lithuania and other European countries, the professor takes an active part in international projects, initiates and implements them. I. Baranauskienė was awarded the title of the honorary doctor of the university “Ukraine” for her practical activities and support to the Ukrainian system of higher education. The professor has been elected as an expert in the area of Education Science in Latvian Academy of Sciences for a maximum term of three years. I. Baranauskienė is the editor-in-chief of the journal “Social Welfare: Interdisciplinary Approach”, member of editorial boards of several other scientific journals. Currently, in cooperation with other scientists, I. Baranauskienė is investigating the accessibility of the health care system to Lithuanian people with disabilities through participation in the high-level scientific research project “Researching Specialist Training to Provide Holistic Help to People with Disabilities in the Health Care System while Improving Researcher Competencies”. Judith Green, professor emerita of the University of California in Santa Barbara, is the leader of this project. The project is funded by the Research Council of Lithuania jointly with the European Union.


Prof. Liudmila Rupšienė is a professor and senior researcher at Klaipeda University. The main scientific interest – research methodology. Author of a number of books with three of them focusing on research methodology: Methodology of Qualitative Research Data Collection (2007), Methodology of Qualitative Research (2008), Educational Experiment (2016). Published more than 100 scientific articles, made around 100 presentations in scientific conferences in Lithuania and abroad (Latvia, Poland, Spain, Denmark, Russia, USA and many other countries). Member or leader of international and national projects (ERASMUS+ and others), Lithuanian principal investigator in European scientific project ESPAD. Scientific supervisor of doctoral students, supervised for 7 defended doctoral dissertations, chairwoman, member or opponent of around 60 doctoral dissertation defense boards, member of habilitation procedure board, member of the committee for the joint education doctorate of four Lithuanian universities consortium (since 2011). Expert of the State Studies Foundation, Centre for Quality Assessment in Higher Education, the president of Lithuanian Educational Research Association, council member of European Educational Research Association. Member of editorial boards of two Lithuanian academic journals.

 

Date: Tuesday, 13 November 2018.
Time: 12:45 – 14:00.
Venue: Room 203, Runme Shaw Building.
All are welcome!

Policies for Shadow Education in Myanmar

On 18 September 2018, Mark Bray, Nutsa Kobakhidze and Ora Kwo presented a CERC seminar about their UNESCO-funded research in Myanmar. This work was conducted with support from the Yangon University of Education (YUOE), and has led to a manuscript that in due course will be published in CERC’s monograph series.

The CERC seminar noted that 10 days later the work would be considered by Myanmar’s Ministry of Education. The Ministry had organised a full morning for presentation and discussion. The event was opened by the Deputy Minister for Education, and brought together both policy-makers and practitioners from Naypyitaw, Yangon and elsewhere.

The HKU team was proud to see the CERC logo alongside the HKU, YUOE and UNESCO logos on the stage. The report was presented by Mark Bray and Ora Kwo, with support from Zhang Wei, Liu Junyan and Peter Suante (pictured below, left to right).

 

“This was is the first empirical study of its kind in Myanmar,” remarked the coordinator in the UNESCO office. “The government is taking its findings seriously, and will identify its policy implications within the context of the National Education Strategic Plan.”

 

The CERC team is delighted to have had the opportunity to conduct the study over a period of two years. It looks forward to ongoing dialogue with stakeholders in Myanmar, and will also disseminate the findings internationally.

The Policy Brief prepared by the authors can be downloaded here.

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