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CERC Round Table on UNESCO Global Education Monitoring Report

Each year, UNESCO produces a Global Education Monitoring Report to assess progress towards the fourth of the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), which focuses on education and has a target date of 2030. In addition to statistical assessments, the report has a theme. For 2017/18, the theme is ‘Accountability in Education’.

CERC will host a Round Table to discuss the Report, which can be accessed here.

Who: Mark Bray (Chair), Wesley Teter, Zhang Wei, Ora Kwo, Sherzod Khaydarov – and all other around the Round Table.

When: Friday 12 January, 2.00 pm

Where: Meng Wah 531.

Come to learn about the Report and to discuss the themes with colleagues. All are welcome!

GEM Report 2017_18 RT_poster1

Book Launch: Researching Higher Education in Asia

By Jisun Jung, Hugo Horta & Akiyoshi Yonezawa

Chair: Mark Bray

4 December 2017 Monday
11:00 am – 12:30pm
Room 204 Runme Shaw Building

This book traces the evolution of research in the field of higher education in several Asian countries, and shares ideas about the evolving higher education research communities.

It identifies common and dissimilar challenges across national communities, providing insights into the relevance of a greater regional articulation of national higher education research communities, and their further integration into and contribution to the international higher education research community as a whole.

Jisun Jung is an assistant professor at HKU’s Faculty of Education. Her current research focuses on academic professions, doctoral education, employment and postgraduate studies, and higher education research in Asia.

Hugo Horta is an assistant professor at HKU’s Faculty of Education. He formerly served as the deputy-director at the Center for Innovation, Technology and Policy Research (IN+), based at the University of Lisbon, Portugal. He is a Coordinating-Editor of Higher Education (Springer).

Akiyoshi Yonezawa is a professor and director of the Office of Institutional Research, Tohoku University. He is a board member at the Japan Association for Higher Education Research. He is a co-editor of Springer’s Book Series Higher Education in Asia: Quality, Excellence and Governance.

Doctoral Education in Europe and China

By Barbara M. Kehm

Robert Owen Centre for Educational Change School of Education, University of Glasgow

Chair: Jisun Jung

12:45 – 14:00, 21 September, 2017 (Thursday)
Room 205 Runme Shaw Building

The presentation is based on an analysis of recent changes in doctoral education that can be observed in Europe and China. It traces the policies having led to these changes and discusses related policy transfer looking at differences and similarities in the underlying rationales. The presentation will emphasise in particular the extended policy field for doctoral education which is no longer regarded as an exclusively academic affair but has become an object of institutional management, national policy making and – at least in Europe – supra-national agenda setting. A further part of the presentation will have a closer look at the multiplication of purposes and models for doctoral education. The presentation will discuss two overarching issues which are equally in the centre of debates and policy-making in Europe and China: Quality management and internationalisation of doctoral education. In the concluding part I will reflect on the implications of the extended policy field and the diversification of doctoral training models in terms of the questions (a) how this reflects on quality assurance mechanisms, (b) who is qualified to convey the extended skills set and (c) whether academic careers remain sufficiently attractive to attract the best and the brightest talent.

About the speaker:

Barbara M. Kehm is specialised in research on higher education, worked at the International Centre for Higher Education Research (INCHER) at the University of Kassel (Germany) and the Institute for Higher Education Research (HoF) at the University of Halle-Wittenberg (Germany). She was a professor and Director in INCHER from 2004 to 2011 before she joined in the Glasgow in 2013. She has published extensively (more than 30 books and more than 250 book chapters and journal articles) on issues of internationalisation, changes in doctoral education, new forms of governance and processes of professionalization. She has been a member of a variety of academic advisory boards as well as the international advisory board of the University of Helsinki (Finland) and currently is a member of the Board of Governors of two German universities. She has been a visiting professor at the University of Damaskus (Syria), RMIT Melbourne (Australia), South West Jiaotong University in Chengdu and BUAA in Beijing (China), the Catholic University in Santiago (Chile) and the National University of Buenos Aires (Argentina).

~ ALL ARE WELCOME ~

Please register at: https://hkuems1.hku.hk/hkuems/ec_regform.aspx?guest=Y&ueid=51678

 

New MEd-CGSED Cohort

Each year, HKU welcomes a new and dynamic cohort of students for the MEd programme in Comparative and Global Studies in Education and Development (CGSED). The 25 students in the 2017/18 are as dynamic as their predecessors. They come from 9 countries/jurisdictions, namely:

Croatia

China Mainland

Ethiopia

Hong Kong

Myanmar

Philippines

South Sudan

USA

Uzbekistan

Three are studying part-time (two years) and 22 are studying full-time (one year). CERC is delighted to welcome the group, and much looks forward to working with them.

Women as Leaders of Higher Education Institutions

By Barbara M. Kehm

Chair: Jisun Jung

Date: September 14, 2017 (Thursday)
Time: 12:45 – 14:00
Venue: Room 205, Runme Shaw Building
This presentation is based on a comparison of women as leaders of higher education institutions in the UK and in Germany. As of 2013, only 17% of Vice Chancellors of UK universities and 12% of presidents of German universities were women. The presentation discusses findings from a small explorative study consisting of interviews with eight female Vice Chancellors of British and German higher education institutions. Based on a feminist poststructuralist approach it looks at the ways in which characteristics of ‘ideal’ leaders in academia are discursively produced in a number of gendered ways and at the influence of dominant academic cultures, status of institution and national policy landscapes. From an analysis of the findings I argue that as well as increasing the numerical proportion of women leaders in academia, work also needs to be done to challenge academic cultural practices and dominant gendered conceptualisations of the ‘leader’.

Barbara M. Kehm is specialised in research on higher education, worked at the International Centre for Higher Education Research (INCHER) at the University of Kassel (Germany) and the Institute for Higher Education Research (HoF) at the University of Halle-Wittenberg (Germany). She was a professor and Director in INCHER from 2004 to 2011 before she joined in the Glasgow in 2013. She has published extensively (more than 30 books and more than 250 book chapters and journal articles) on issues of internationalisation, changes in doctoral education, new forms of governance and processes of professionalization. She has been a member of a variety of academic advisory boards as well as the international advisory board of the University of Helsinki (Finland) and currently is a member of the Board of Governors of two German universities. She has been a visiting professor at the University of Damaskus (Syria), RMIT Melbourne (Australia), South West Jiaotong University in Chengdu and BUAA in Beijing (China), the Catholic University in Santiago (Chile) and the National University of Buenos Aires (Argentina).

Please register at: https://hkuems1.hku.hk/hkuems/ec_regform.aspx?guest=Y&ueid=51677

India’s Aid and Soft Power in Africa: The Case of Education and Training

You’re cordially invited to the next CERC seminar on the coming Wednesday, 17 May 2017 from 12:45 – 14:00 in Room 203 of Runme Shaw Building:

India’s Aid and Soft Power in Africa: The Case of Education and Training

By Kenneth and Pravina King

Chair: Mark Bray

The core of India’s cooperation narrative with Africa is capacity-building. Though often termed an ‘emerging’ donor, its history of supporting scholarships and training for the ‘South’ goes back as early as 1946. Like China, its more formal mechanisms for supporting training date from 1964, and their academic institutions for the study of Africa and West Asia also, like China’s, date from the early 1960s. Eight years after China’s first Forum on China-Africa Cooperation, India organized a series of India-Africa Forum Summits, providing ambitious targets for concessional loans, as well as for India- Africa educational partnerships. The presentation will examine several of these, along with a discussion of African students in India – a hot topic – and the absence of any Indian parallel to China’s 46 Confucius Institutes in Africa.

Kenneth KING is Professor Emeritus, University of Edinburgh, where he was Director of the Centre of African Studies for 20 years. Since 2006/7 when he was Distinguished Visiting Professor in HKU, Kenneth has worked with Pravina on China’s education aid and soft power in Africa. The book resulting from this research was China’s aid and soft power in Africa (James Currey, 2013)

Pravina KING was administrator of Edinburgh’s Centre of African Studies for 15 years, and organizer of Scotland-Africa ’97.

Date: Wednesday, 17 May 2017
Time: 12:45 – 14:00
Venue:Room 203 Runme Shaw Building

The presentation is supported by the presenters’ research grant on “China-Africa University Partnerships in Education and Training: Students, Trainees, Teachers and Researchers” from the Research Grants Council of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China (RGC/GRF Project No.: HKU842912H).

seminar 17 May 2017 poster_final

 

BOOK LAUNCH AND TALK: Comparative and International Education: Issues for Teachers (2nd edition)

Speakers: Ruth Hayhoe and Li Jun

Chair: Mark Bray

Friday 21 April, 11:45am-12:45 pm.

Room 403 Runme Shaw Building

The first edition of this book, published in Canada, was developed a decade ago to help teachers in multicultural schools to understand the nature and value of comparative and international education. This second edition, published in 2017, builds on the strengths of the first edition. Among the revised chapters is one co-authored by Ruth Hayhoe and Li Jun entitled ‘Philosophy and Comparative Education: What can we learn from East Asia’.

Ruth Hayhoe is one of the co-editors of the book. She is a professor at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto. Her professional engagements in Asia have spanned 35 years, including foreign expert at Fudan University in Shanghai in the early 1980s, First Secretary for Education, Science and Culture at the Canadian Embassy in Beijing, 1989-1991, and Director of the Hong Kong Institute of Education, 1997-2002. Several of her books, including her autobiography, Full Circle: A Life with Hong Kong and China, have been published by CERC.

Li Jun is a CERC member in the PASSE Division of the Faculty of Education. He was originally trained as a historian of Chinese education and later as a policy analyst of international education and development, each with a PhD. With Ruth Hayhoe and also Lin Jing and Zha Qiang he co-authored the CERC book Portraits of 21st Century Chinese Universities: In the Move to Mass Higher Education.

Click here for the poster.

Migration, Religious Security, and Public Schooling within the Liberal Democratic State

By Bruce A Collet

Chair: Liz Jackson

To what degree might public schools play positive and supporting roles among migrant communities within which religion provides a sense of security? What do these roles look like? What defines the limitations that schools in liberal democratic states face in specifying and fulfilling these roles? In this talk I examine religion, culture, and the self within the liberal democratic state, with particular emphasis on examining the relationship between autonomy and religious affiliation. I then move to an overview of the social science literature on migration and religion, and the role of religion in integration. Finally, I synthesize the first two parts of the talk by examining lessons public schools might draw from what the social sciences tell us regarding religious security amongst migrant communities, and how school policies might be informed by this work while still remaining true to core liberal democratic principles.

Bruce Collet is an Associate Professor in Educational Foundations and Inquiry at Bowling Green State University in Ohio, where he teaches courses in diversity and education, comparative education, and the philosophy of education, and serves as a core faculty member in Bowlinghkch Green’s Master of Arts in Cross-Cultural and International Education program. His main research focus concerns migration, religion and schooling. He is currently working on a book, Migration, Religion, and Schooling within Liberal Democratic States (forthcoming with Routledge, 2017). Dr. Collet serves as Chief Editor of the journal Diaspora, Indigenous, and Minority Education.

Date: Tuesday, 14 February 2017

Time: 12:45 – 14:30

Venue: RM 202, Runme Shaw Building, HKU

Click here for the poster.

All are welcome!

Unearthing the Human: A Posthuman Approach to Human Evolution and Education for Sustainable Development

By Simon Ceder

Chair: Liz Jackson

Over the last 15 years, there has been increasing interest in using posthuman approaches in edu-cational research, particularly in early childhood education, but also in research methodology and curriculum studies. This seminar presents an overview of this development. It also proposes ways to introduce post-human perspectives into two areas that so far have been fairly untouched by this approach, namely philosophy of education and education for sustainable development. This introduction will be performed using the example of human evolution.

Simon Ceder received his PhD in Education from Lund Uni-versity Sweden 2016 with the thesis “Cutting Through Water: Towards a Posthuman Theory of Educational Relationality”. Before becoming a researcher, he was working as a high school teacher and teacher educator in questions regarding gender and equal treatment. Currently, Dr. Ceder is a senior lecturer at University of Skövde teaching educational courses and starting up a new research project with a focus on human evolution.

Date: Friday 16 December 2016
Time: 14.00 – 15.15
Venue: Room 204 Runme Shaw Building

All are welcome!

Simon Ceder

Traveling Researchers, Colonial Difference: Comparative Education in an Age of Exploration

By Noah W. Sobe

Chair: Mark Bray

This seminar examines Marc-Antoine Jullien’s 1816/17 Esquisse et Vues Préliminaries d’un ouvrage sur L’Éducation Comparée in relation to European traditions of travel and global colonial expansion.  It argues that principles of colonial difference saturate Jullien’s proposal — notably in the ways that it enables and disables subjectivities and subject positions as well as in how it reifies social and contextual categories of analysis.  Jullien’s proposal did not found a discipline nor did it spark a continuous conversation, yet it is an instance in the establishment of the field that shows the stubbornly durable entanglement of educational comparison with colonialism.

Noah W. Sobe is Professor of Cultural and Educational Policy Studies at Loyola University Chicago, where he also directs the Center for Comparative Education.  Professor Sobe is President-Elect of the Comparative and International Education Society (CIES), and co-editor of the journal European Education which is affiliated with the Comparative Education Society in Europe (CESE).

Date: Wednesday 7 December 2016
Time: 10:00 – 11:15 am
Venue: Room 203 Runme Shaw Building

Noah Sobe Poster

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