Shadow Education SIG meeting, 30 June 2020

Ms Shalini Bhorkar, a 3rd-year PhD candidate at the UCL Institute of Education, made a virtual presentation for the Shadow Education SIG on June 30. The title of presentation was: “Power, interests and ideas: A disaggregated theoretical approach for political economy analysis of private tutoring in Maharashtra state, India.”

The SIG was joined by Prof Mark Bray from HKU, Dr Will Brehm from UCL IoE, Dr Siyuan Feng from HKU, Dr Achala Gupta from UCL IoE, Dr Rafsan Mahmud from Open University Bangladesh, Dr Vít Šťastný From Charles University Prague and Dr Kevin Yung from the Education University of Hong Kong.

Many SIG’s current and previous members joined the meeting. It was chaired by Dr Nutsa Kobakhidze from HKU.

Shadow Education SIG members gathered virtually via Zoom on May 19, 2020

Shadow Education SIG members gathered virtually via Zoom on May 19, 2020 to listen to a presentation by Dr Vít Šťastný (Institute for Research and Development of Education, Faculty of Education, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic). The topic of the presentation was “Mainstream Schools as Shadow Education Providers in the Czech Republic.”

The SIG was chaired by Dr Nutsa Kobakhidze from HKU and well attended by SIG members as well as guests from various locations.

The Shadow Education SIG members met virtually on 12 May, 2020 at 3:00 pm HKT.

Peter Suante (a PhD candidate at HKU) made a power point presentation on his experiences of field research in Myanmar. The title of Peter’s presentation was: Reflections on Private Tuition Field Research in Myanmar. Dr Nutsa Kobakhidze facilitated the meeting. Prof Mark Bray, Dr Ora Kwo, Dr Kevin Yung, Dr Zhang Wei, Dr Vít Šťastný, Dr Rafsan Mahmud attended the meeting together with many current PhD and MEd students, as well as past members of the SIG connecting from different parts of the world.

​Global Higher Education Bulletin (Hong Kong), Vol. 3, No. 3 May 1, 2020

​Global Higher Education Bulletin (Hong Kong)

Vol. 3, No. 3 May 1, 2020

Editor: Anatoly Oleksiyenko

Greetings!

The spring semester has come to an end. We have undergone yet another challenging period of social disruption. Liz Jackson has wonderfully described the multiple layers of turmoil experienced in the Hong Kong context over the last year in her essay “Weary from the Future, Hong Kong” (you can access it via the following link: https://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007/s42438-020-00116-5.pdf

Following months of mass protest, insecurity and uncertainty in the city have been further fuelled by the outbreak of the COVID-19 coronavirus. Concerns about physical existence, presence, and mobility have remained just as central to discourse during the latter crisis as in the former. The challenges faced during both have presented different obstacles. However, it seems that we have become increasingly adept at managing our anxieties in more sophisticated ways.

Based on my interactions with students, the disruptions of this past year have increased resilience, as much emotionally and intellectually as in our interactions with social, material and natural worlds. During this period, the instrumentalization of new and existing technologies has been a source of opportunity, as we overcome skepticism through thoughtful engagement with the cyberspace. Several students in my course have argued that the synchronous Zoom-based classes have created more opportunities for them to express themselves more freely and feel more engaged than in a regular classroom setting. Suddenly, we have seen more meaningful feedback from the asynchronous components of the learning space, as students have more time to engage with videos, papers, and news reports. Certainly, it is becoming ever-clearer that our emotional and intellectual expectations vary when dealing with the present commonware. Even individual freedom to modulate identities, images, and virtual backgrounds within platforms such as Zoom has been the subject of contrasting interpretations, as we decipher disparate course experiences. I would be interested to hear your opinions and reflections on this matter, and have opened this survey for you to recount your experiences and express your opinions (whether you were in our classes recently, or using online platforms elsewhere in your various roles as teachers, students, and administrators): https://forms.gle/HPibqgApsvSFGgci7. Your thoughts and suggestions will be of immense use to us as we strategize for the next few years. I also hope to share some of your thoughts and suggestions (with your permission) in the next issue.

As we think ahead to the new academic year, we are looking to formulate new ideas regarding course design, mixing in-class and online experiences, and encouraging greater flexibility in blended learning modes. We are also seeking new ways to ensure student engagement, collaboration, workshops, etc. As we delve deeper into the cyberspatial novelties of this difficult time, we also hope that this research will enable further opportunities for part-time students, who have faced additional challenges in the past, as well as mitigate clashes in commitments for employed students by facilitating greater flexibility within the traditional framework of classroom-bound learning.

Currently, we are in the final stages of the admissions process for the new cohort of the M.Ed. – Higher Education program. Many of our candidates seem to have an unprecedented level of confidence about studying in HK, in spite of the turbulence and uncertainty of this time, and have proved to be strategic and resourceful in advancing both their learning and careers in a meaningful way. Our admissions are still open, until May 15. If you know of any university or college professionals who are seeking opportunities for development, please suggest to them that they should consider joining our higher education community, and share this link with them: https://aal.hku.hk/tpg/programme/master-education. I hope that, despite the current state of affairs, our community can and will grow in the coming years.

Finally, I would like to share with you some of the recent projects and papers in our community:

1. Roy Y. Chan is working on the edited volume Coronavirus (COVID-19) and Global Higher Education: Opportunities and Challenges, and invites authors to examine the future of global higher education, and the cost and consequence associated with COVID-19 for societies and individuals. This book will be published by Routledge (Taylor & Francis), Routledge Studies in Global Student Mobility. If you are interested, please submit a chapter abstract of 500 words via Routledge at Click Here. The full Call for Chapter and book project information can be downloaded at Click here. For questions, please contact Roy at rychan@indiana.edu

2. Marina Jinyuang Ma has initiated a special issue for Sustainability (SSCI & SCI Expanded): Transnational Research Collaboration and the Impact, and is currently working with her colleagues: Chuanyi Wang from Tsinghua University and  Yuzhuo Cai from Tampere University. If you are interested to contribute to this volume, please get in touch with Marina at majy@sustech.edu.cn

3. Kent Fo has recently published a paper in collaboration with Sarah Aiston. Please see Aiston, S. J. & Fo, C. K. (2020): The silence/ing of academic women. Gender and Education, DOI: 10.1080/09540253.2020.1716955

4. You may also want to read most recent publications from our faculty members:

Horta, H. (2020). PhD Students’ Self-Perception of Skills Acquired During Their PhD and Plans for Their Postdoctoral Careers: A Joint Analysis of Doctoral Students at Three Flagship Universities in Asia. In Structural and Institutional Transformations in Doctoral Education (pp. 275-323). Palgrave Macmillan, Cham.

Horta, H., & Mok, K. H. (2020). Challenges to research systems, academic research and knowledge production in East Asia: learning from the past to inform future policy. Journal of Higher Education Policy and Management, 42 (2), 119-133.

Horta, H., & Santos, J. M. (2020). The Multidimensional Research Agendas Inventory—Revised (MDRAI-R): Factors shaping researchers’ research agendas in all fields of knowledge. Quantitative Science Studies, 1(1), 60-93.

Jackson, L. (2020). ‘But is it really research?’ Mentoring students as theorists in the era of cybernetic capitalism. Educational Philosophy and Theory, 52 (1), 17-21.

Li, Y. (2020). Language–content partnership in higher education: development and opportunities. Higher Education Research & Development, 1-15.

Peters, M., Oladele, O. M., Green, B., Samilo, A., Lv, H., Amina, L., Wang, Y., Mou, C., Chunga, J., Xu, R., Ianina, T., Hollings, S., Yousef, M., Jandric, P., Sturm, S., Li, J., Xu, E., Jackson, L. & Tesar, M. (2020). Education in and for the Belt and Road Initiative: The Pedagogy of Collective Writing. Educational Philosophy and Theory, 1-24.

Postiglione, G. A. (2020). International Cooperation in East Asian Higher Education. In In: AI-Youbi A., Zahed A., Tierney W. (eds). Successful Global Collaborations in Higher Education Institutions (pp. 31-39). Springer, Cham.

Ros, V., Eam, P., Heng, S., & Ravy, S. (2020). Cambodian Academics: Identities and Roles (No. 120). CDRI Working Paper Series.

Santos, J. M., Horta, H., & Zhang, L. F. (2020). The association of thinking styles with research agendas among academics in the social sciences. Higher Education Quarterly, 74(2), 193-210.

I will be in touch with you before the beginning of the new academic year, to update you on our new developments in teaching and research.

Stay safe and be well!

Br>

With kind regards,
Anatoly

Shadow Education in Myanmar

CERC is pleased to announce the co-publication with UNESCO of the book entitled Shadow Education in Myanmar: Private Supplementary Tutoring and its Policy Implications.
The book, written by Mark Bray, Magda Nutsa Kobakhidze and Ora Kwo, presents the first detailed empirical study in Myanmar of a phenomenon that is of increasing visibility and significance in high-, medium- and low-income countries across the world. Private supplementary tutoring is widely called shadow education because it reflects curriculum changes in schools.
The study results from a partnership with the UNESCO office in Yangon and with colleagues from the Yangon University of Education (YUOE). Among the students sampled for this study, over 80% were receiving shadow education; and among the teachers sampled, nearly half were providers. Other tutoring was received from informal providers and through registered companies.
The study exposes the significance of this phenomenon for the lives of students, the work of teachers, and the broader society. It has far-reaching implications for the educational reforms on which the Myanmar government has embarked. The study also has much of interest for international comparative analysis.
The book is available for free download HERE(M13-Jun2020-whole), and paper copies may be acquired from the CERC office with a small charge to cover mailing costs (email cerc@hku.hk).

Global Higher Education Bulletin (Hong Kong), Vol. 3, No. 2 January 16, 2020

​Global Higher Education Bulletin (Hong Kong)

Vol. 3, No. 2 January 16, 2020

Editor: Anatoly Oleksiyenko​

Greetings from Hong Kong!

I hope you had a good beginning of the year, and are ready for the new academic semester. The HKU campus is coming back to normal operation, and the access is much easier to the gates and major entries than before. Our international visitors have experienced no problem with their stay on campus over the last few weeks.

Earlier this week, I had a meeting with the Rector of Moscow City University (a major municipal university in Russia) who expressed interest in building stronger relations for his international programs in teacher training and had been looking for opportunities to enhance exchanges with teacher training faculties in Hong Kong. Professor Gustavo Fischman from Arizona State University is visiting with us these days to discuss strategies for improving knowledge exchange in the Faculty. Tomorrow, Professor Fischman will make a presentation “In search of impactful educational research: Assessing the knowledge mobilization strategies of highly ranked colleges of education” (Meng Wah Complex, Room 411-412, 10:00-11:30). In the coming months, we are anticipating more visits and I will keep you informed on exchange opportunities or presentation events.

Meanwhile, last month, our community members, Dr. Jisun Jung and Ms. Nian Ruan made presentations at the annual conference of the Society for Research in Higher Education (SRHE) in New Port, Wales. A group of our scholars are currently preparing for the upcoming annual conference of the Comparative and International Education Society in Miami, USA. If you are planning your conference travels this year, please pay attention to calls for proposals for the annual conferences of the Association for the Study of Higher Education (in New Orleans, USA), Consortium of Higher Education Researchers (at the University of Rijeka, Croatia) – those should be announced in February. The applications are currently admitted to the annual conferences of the Canadian Society for Studies in Higher Education (in London, Ontario; deadline – January 20), Comparative Education Society of Asia (in Kathmandu, Nepal, deadline – January 31); and the European Consortium for Political Research, which has a great number of panels on higher education (Innsbruck, Austria; deadline – Feb 19).

Finally, I would like to share with you the most recent publications by our faculty members and alums:

Carless, D. (2020). Longitudinal perspectives on students’ experiences of feedback: a need for teacher–student partnerships. Higher Education Research & Development, 1-14.

Cattaneo, M., Horta, H., & Meoli, M. (2019). Dual appointments and research collaborations outside academia: evidence from the European academic population. Studies in Higher Education, 44(11), 2066-2080.

Chan, R. (2019). Review of the book by Perna, L.W. (ed). (2018). Taking it to the streets: The role of scholarship in advocacy and advocacy in scholarship. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University. 148pp. in Journal of Higher Education Outreach and Engagement, 23 (3), 230-233.

Jackson, L. (2020). ‘But is it really research? ’mentoring students as theorists in the era of cybernetic capitalism. Education Philosophy and Theory, 52 (1), 17-21.

Lanford, M., Tierney, W. G., & Lincoln, Y. (2019). The art of life history: novel approaches, future directions. Qualitative Inquiry, 25 (5), 459-463.

Lanford, M. (2020). Long-Term Sustainability in Global Higher Education Partnerships. In Successful Global Collaborations in Higher Education Institutions (pp. 87-93). Springer, Cham.

Ma, J. (2019). Developing joint R&D institutes between Chinese universities and international enterprises in China’s innovation system: A case at Tsinghua University. Sustainability, 11(24), 7133.

Yang, R. (2020). Benefits and challenges of the international mobility of researchers: The Chinese experience. Globalisation, Societies and Education, 18(1), 53-65.

At the moment Liz Jackson and I are continuing to receive papers for the volume “Freedom to Teach, Freedom To Learn: Higher Education and Human Dignity”. If you are finishing paper for this project, or might want to join it last minute, please let me know. I am also collaborating with Giulio Marini at the Institute of Education of the University of London on a Special Issue “Academic Freedom in Europe and Beyond”, recently approved by Higher Education Quarterly. The Special Issue is set up for 2022 – we expect to receive extended abstracts not later than by the end of this year, and full papers by June 2021. Please send me your proposal if you are interested.

I will be sending you more updates in the spring.

Happy Chinese New Year! Have a productive and prosperous year!

Global Higher Education Bulletin (Hong Kong), Vol. 3, No. 1 November 4, 2019

Global Higher Education Bulletin (Hong Kong)

Vol. 3, No. 1 November 4, 2019

Editor: Anatoly Oleksiyenko

 

Greetings from Hong Kong!

The first semester of the current academic year has been turbulent in the city. Nevertheless, we persevered to make our program professionally magnetic and engaging on many important issues related to social, political and educational dilemmas in Hong Kong and beyond. Our Higher Education cohort this year includes students from China, Hong Kong, Japan and the USA, and we are excited to have them collaboratively contributing to higher learning in the community (tonight, four teams will be making their final presentations in the Comparative Higher Education Policy Studies course on stakeholder perceptions of (dis)advantages within a selection of higher education systems, and if you are interested to attend send me your email). Meanwhile, our former MEd graduate Mr. Stone Li Xiaoshi joined our PhD student cohort in September and is working now under supervision of Dr. Jisun Jung. We are happy to have him as part of our research team. We also know that a good number of our alumni are preparing PhD and EdD proposal submissions these days (deadlines December 2, 2019 and February 13, 2020 respectively). We wish them all good luck.

Also, we have been privileged to host international visitors who continue to contribute to our projects of inquiry and learning in higher education. Among others, it was a pleasure to see on our campus Dr. Michael Lanford, 2010-11 class, who is now Assistant Professor at the University of North Georgia in the US. We are awaiting more visits from friends and colleagues in the future, and here are some current updates from us:

1.     On Nov 7, 2019, Dr. Riyad Shahjahan from Michigan State University will speak “On ‘Being for Others’: Time and Shame in the Neoliberal Academy”. This talk will be held at 12:45-14:00 in Runme Shaw Building, Room 204.

2.     On Nov 11, 2019, Dr. Yangson Kim and Dr. Machi Sato from Hiroshima University will make presentation on “Exploring Academics in Socio-cultural Contexts: Focusing on Experiences and Challenges of Junior Female Academics (JFAs) in Japanese Universities”. This talk will take place at 12:45-14:00 in Runme Shaw Building, Room 205.

3.     You can also connect with these visitors as well as with other colleagues (e.g., Dr. Ryan Allen, Prof. Simon Marginson, Prof. Joshua Mok Ka-Ho, Dr. Anna Lin, Dr. William Lo Yat Wai, Prof. Adam Nelson, Prof. Deane Neubauer, Prof. Rui Yang, and others) at the upcoming Conference for Higher Education Research (CHER), held on Nov 8-10, 2019 at Lingnan University. Our Faculty’s community members: Ms. Cathy Huang, Dr. Jisun Jung, and Dr. Anatoly Oleksiyenko will also speak there at the end of the week. More information can be found under this link: https://cher-hongkong.iafor.org/cher-hongkong2019/

4.     Our colleagues from the Comparative Education Research Centre (Dr. Liz Jackson and her team) are moving forward with preparation of the 49th Annual Conference of the Philosophy of Education Society of Australasia (PESA). HKU will host this conference on December 7-11, 2019. “Philosophical Dialogues in Education, East Meets West” will address a range of challenges in higher learning and education in general. If you are keen to understand the complexity of contextual interpretations in the following conference themes: truth and harmony, individual rights and social responsibility, analytical and holistic thinking, wisdom and knowledge, contemplation and action, reason and reality, transformation and Ideology, self and others, freedom and community, you should explore more about this conference at https://pesa.org.au/conference

 

Meanwhile, if you are an avid reader in the field of higher education, we would recommend the following most recent publications from our community (June-October 2019):

 

Books:

Oleksiyenko, A. (2019). Academic Collaborations in the Global Marketplace. Cham: Springer.

Postiglione, G. (2019). Education, Ethnicity, Society and Global Change In Asia: The Selected Works Of Gerard A. Postiglione. Routledge: New York and London.

Winstone, N., & Carless, D. (2019). Designing effective feedback processes in higher education: A learning-focused approach. Routledge. (Dr. Carless recently hosted a great book presentation).

 

Papers:

Carless, D. (2019). Feedback loops and the longer-term: towards feedback spirals. Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education44(5), 705-714.

Carless, D. (2019). Learners’ Feedback Literacy and the Longer Term: Developing Capacity for Impact. In The Impact of Feedback in Higher Education (pp. 51-65). Palgrave Macmillan, Cham.

Chian, M. M. , Bridges, S. M. , & Lo, E. C. (2019). The Triple Jump in Problem-Based Learning: Unpacking Principles and Practices in Designing Assessment for Curriculum Alignment. Interdisciplinary Journal of Problem-Based Learning, 13(2).

Horta, H., Jung, J., Zhang, L. F., & Postiglione, G. A. (2019). Academics’ job-related stress and institutional commitment in Hong Kong universities. Tertiary Education and Management, 1-22.

Horta, H., & Shen, W. (2019). Current and future challenges of the Chinese research system. Journal of Higher Education Policy and Management, 1-21.

Jackson, L. (2019). Protesting the identity of Hong Kong: The burdened virtues of contemporary ‘pretty’ nationalism. Educational Philosophy and Theoryhttps://doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2019.1637730

Jackson, L., & Muñoz‐García, A. L. (2019). Reaction Is Not Enough: Decreasing Gendered Harassment in Academic Contexts in Chile, Hong Kong, and the United States. Educational Theory69(1), 17-33.

Jung, J. (2019). The fourth industrial revolution, knowledge production and higher education in South Korea. Journal of Higher Education Policy and Management, 1-23.

Jung, J. (2019). Learning experience and academic identity building by master’s students in Hong Kong. Studies in Higher Education, 1-14.

Lin, C., & Jackson, L. (2019). Multiculturalism in Chinese history in Hong Kong: constructing Chinese identity. Asia Pacific Journal of Education39(2), 209-221.

Manning, K., Kushnazarov, M., & Oleksiyenko, A. (2019). Contested Meanings of International Student Mobility in Hong Kong and Taiwan. Educational Practice and Theory41(1), 51-69.

Oleksiyenko, A., & Ros, V. (2019). Cambodian lecturers’ pursuit of academic excellence: expectations vs. reality. Asia Pacific Journal of Education39(2), 222-236.

Postiglione, G., & Tang, M. (2019). International experience in TVET-industry cooperation for China’s poorest province. International Journal of Training Research17(sup1), 131-143.

Postiglione, G. A. (2020). International Cooperation in East Asian Higher Education. In Successful Global Collaborations in Higher Education Institutions (pp. 31-39). Cham: Springer.

 

Please stay in touch and send us your updates to share privately or in the network.

The Peace, Conflict, and Sustainable Development SIG Event, 27 October 2019

The Peace, Conflict, and Sustainable Development SIG met for a panel discussion on Sunday, 27th of October, learning about refugee and asylum seeker-led organisations in Hong Kong that are changing the narratives and taking charge of their identities in Hong Kong.
We were joined by representatives from Refugee Union, Art Women HK, Harmony HK, and The Africa Center. They shared about the many social, educational, and medical issues faced by asylum seekers and refugees in Hong Kong and also the struggle to re-define the identity of asylum seekers, refugees, and Africans in Hong Kong. In a city that is not as multicultural as it seems, more needs to be known about the many, different people who call Hong Kong home. Only when ignorance is educated, can we change and grow. It was an enlightening, powerful, and emotional afternoon.
Thank you to our panel guests for sharing, and for everyone who was able to join us.

The Shadow Education SIG’s meeting on 23 October, 2019

The Shadow Education SIG members gathered again on 23 October, Wednesday, at 3:30 pm in RMS 403, HKU. The SIG had two speakers: Feng Suyuan (a PhD student) presented on “Brokers Behind the International University Admission:  An Investigation on Education Agents in China” and Wang Haoxian (a guest speaker from Fudan University, China) presented on “The Impact of China’s New Private Education Policy:  Observations from the Private Tutoring Industry”.

The SIG was chaired by Dr Nutsa Kobakhidze and joined by Dr Hugo Horta from HKU and Dr Kevin Yung from the Education University of Hong Kong.

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